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Prague Culture

Pub Etiquette: “The Czech club is a highly democratic establishment. If there's a free of charge table or seat, it really is yours.”—Evan Rail, author, Good Beer Guide Prague and also the Czech Republic. Most bars do not require bookings nor do they anticipate you to definitely wait to-be sitting. If just offered seats are in tables along with other visitors, it's perfectly acceptable to ask if you can join their particular dining table (using any mix of Czech, English, German, and sign language that really works). When you order, the beers will keep coming unless you state end, either by asking to pay for or, in the event that situation is hopeless, placing a coaster over your cup.

Checking out a personal Home: Don’t be surprised in case your number asks one to remove your footwear at door. Czechs hardly ever wear footwear in the home. If you’re headed to a personal party, choose your clothes accordingly—chances have you been are going to be standing around inside all evening.

Buying: When entering a shop, it is great ways to greet the shopkeeper or sales clerk with a cheerful “Dobry den!” (good time). Once you leave—even in the event that you just ended set for a moment to browse—turn and provide everybody else a hearty “Na shledanou!” (good-bye).

Operating the Tram or Metro: On a crowded vehicle, always provide your chair to an adult girl, an expecting girl, or any disabled guests. Maybe not doing this dangers incurring the wrath of the remaining car.

Tipping: Tips usually are perhaps not included in the price of restaurant meals. On smaller tabs, round-up the nearest ten-crown period. On larger expenses, 10 percent is regarded as standard. Don’t leave your tip on the dining table, instead hand it directly to your host whenever you spend the bill.

Term Book

English understanding has improved greatly previously couple of years and you’re not likely to own any major language issues. Nonetheless, somewhat Czech is definitely valued and may significantly help.

Ahoj!: Literally “Ahoy!” Though there’s no Bohemian sea, the conventional informal way to say hi or hello. Pronounced a-hoy.

Cau!: Informal greeting utilized for both hey and good-bye. Often doubled up as Cau-Cau! Pronounced Ciao!

Dobry den: Good day. More formal than Ahoj! or Cau! Pronounced DOH-bree DEN.

Dobry vecer: Great night. Pronounced DOH-bree VECH-er.

Dekuji: Thank you. Hard to pronounce but worth your time and effort. Pronounced DYEK-oo-yee.

Na shledanou: Goodbye. Usually shortened to Na-shle! (Pronounced NAH-skle!) Pronounced NAH-skle-DAH-noh.

Ano: Yes. Frequently shortened—confusingly for English speakers—to ‘no. Pronounced AH-no.

Ne: The real word for no. Pronounced NE.

Jedno pivo, prosim: One alcohol, please. The first thing you say in a pub after Dobry den! Pronounced YED-noh PEE-voh PROH-seem.

Jeste jedno, prosim: Another round, please; the handiest term inside dictionary. Pronounced YESHT-ye YED-noh PROH-seem.

Source: travel.nationalgeographic.com
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